The Right to Counsel and Privilege Against Self-incrimination: Rights and Liberties Under the Law

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ABC-CLIO, 2004 - 399 páginas
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An extensive analysis of two complementary rights of the accused, their interpretation by the U.S. Supreme Court, and the ongoing debate over their role in the criminal justice system.


Right to Counsel and Privilege against Self-Incrimination: Rights and Liberties under the Law explores the origins, historical development, current status, and future of two rights intended to protect persons accused of crimes. Two shocking case studies--Powell v. Alabama and Brown v. Mississippi--reveal the brutal injustices suffered by Southern blacks in the 1930s and explain how the Supreme Court made landmark decisions to expand the coverage of the right to counsel and the privilege against self-incrimination.

After a brief review of the English and colonial origins of these rights, a careful analysis of each focuses primarily on the revolutionary cases of the 20th century that produced a convergence of these rights in the famous case of Miranda v. Arizona (1966). The work examines subsequent cases and discusses issues that lie ahead, including those related to the war on terror.


  • Alphabetized set of entries on major personalities such as Joseph McCarthy and judicial decisions such as the Miranda decision and Gideon v. Wainwright
  • Annotated bibliography containing a full list of references, including a listing of secondary sources cited throughout the book

 

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Índice

III
1
V
14
VI
21
VII
25
VIII
26
IX
27
X
47
XI
50
XXIX
175
XXX
182
XXXI
211
XXXII
220
XXXIII
228
XXXV
231
XXXVI
236
XXXVII
241

XII
51
XIII
53
XIV
61
XV
68
XVI
72
XVII
75
XVIII
84
XIX
86
XX
95
XXI
96
XXII
99
XXIII
100
XXIV
143
XXV
149
XXVI
166
XXVII
172
XXVIII
174
XXXVIII
246
XXXIX
247
XL
251
XLI
255
XLII
273
XLIII
277
XLIV
283
XLVI
331
XLIX
334
L
336
LI
340
LII
351
LIII
361
LIV
369
LV
385
LVI
399
Direitos de autor

Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página xi - Let me add that a bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular, and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inference.
Página xviii - The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy, to place them beyond the reach of majorities and officials and to establish them as legal principles to be applied by the courts. One's right to life, liberty, and property, to free speech, a free press, freedom of worship and assembly, and other fundamental rights may not be submitted to vote; they depend on the outcome of no elections.

Acerca do autor (2004)

John B. Taylor, PhD, is Louis L. Goldstein Professor of Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Political Science at Washington College, Chestertown, MD, specializing in American constitutional law and history.

Informação bibliográfica