Understanding Cultures through Their Key Words: English, Russian, Polish, German, and Japanese

Capa
Oxford University Press, 07/08/1997 - 328 páginas
This book develops the dual themes that languages can differ widely in their vocabularies, and are also sensitive indices to the cultures to which they belong. Wierzbicka seeks to demonstrate that every language has "key concepts," expressed in "key words," which reflect the core values of a given culture. She shows that cultures can be revealingly studied, compared, and explained to outsiders through their key concepts, and that the analytical framework necessary for this purpose is provided by the "natural semantic metalanguage," based on lexical universals, that the author and colleagues have developed on the basis of wide-ranging cross-linguistic investigations. Appealing to anthropologists, psychologists, and philosophers as well as linguists, this book demonstrates that cultural patterns can be studied in a verifiable, rigorous, and non-speculative way, on the basis of empirical evidence and in a coherent theoretical framework.
 

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Índice

1 Introduction
1
Patterns of Friendship Across Cultures
32
Freedom in Latin English Russian and Polish
125
Homeland and Fatherland in German Polish and Russian
156
5 Australian Key Words and Core Cultural Values
198
6 Japanese Key Words and Core Cultural Values
235
Notes
281
References
293
Index
309
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Acerca do autor (1997)

Dr. Anna Wierzbicka is Professor of Linguistics at the Australian National University. She has lectured extensively at universities in Europe, America, and Japan, and is the author of many books, including Semantics: Primes and Universals (OUP, 1996) and Semantics, Culture, and Cognition: Universal Human Concepts in Human-Specific Configurations (OUP, 1992).

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