Indigenous Rights and Development: Self-determination in an Amazonian Community

Capa
Berghahn Books, 1997 - 354 páginas

The Arakmbut are an indigenous people who live in the Madre de Dios region of the southeastern Peruvian rain forest. Since their first encounters with missionaries in the 1950s, they have shown resilience and a determination to affirm their identity in the face of many difficulties. During the last fifteen years, Arakmbut survival has been under threat from a goldrush that has attracted hundreds of colonists onto their territories. This trilogy of books traces the ways in which the Arakmbut overcome the dangers that surround them: their mythology and cultural strength; their social flexibility; and their capacity to incorporate non-indigenous concepts and activities into their defence strategies. Each area is punctuated by the constant presence of the invisible spirit, which provides a seamless theme connecting the books to eachother.

Over a period of about two decades the indigenous movement has grown into an international force, making a marked impact on the United Nations and the International Labor Organization. In this volume, the author looks at the growing consciousness among the Arakmbut who are increasingly demanding that their rights to their territories and resources should be respected in tandem with the growing development of indigenous rights internationally. However, the author points to a significant difference of perception: whereas non-indigenous human-rights legislation receives its legitimacy by judicial means, the Arakmbut find their legal system legitimized through the spirit world. The invisibility of this world makes it appear non-existent to non-indigenous observers. However, to overlook its importance prevents outsiders from understanding and appreciating its significance in the Arakmbut struggle for survival.

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Índice

Introduction
1
The indigenous peoples of Peru
3
Indigenous Rights from Patio to Palais
21
State and Community in the Peruvian Amazon
54
Arakmbut Territories and Resources
90
1 Arakmbut communities and their territories
100
Resource use in San José
113
2 Colonists on the territory of San José
123
1 Arakmbut government
218
2 Indigenous Communities in the Madre de Dios
231
An Alternative to the Impasse
236
Planned road through San José
248
1 Difference between Colonists and Indigenous
265
Selfdetermination and Arakmbut Decolonisation
274
Conclusion
310
1 Comparison of Indigenous and Nonindigenous
317

Peoples Persons and Plurals
127
1 Examples of relational pronouns
147
Cultural Heritage
162
Arakmbut Governance
199
Orthography
323
Index
343
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Acerca do autor (1997)

Andrew Gray was, until his untimely death in 1999, Tutor in Social Anthropology at the University of Oxford. He was also a leading activist in indigenous rights, advising the Forest Peoples Programme and the International Working Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGIA) among other organizations.

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