New Monthly Magazine, Volume 109

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Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, Theodore Edward Hook, William Harrison Ainsworth, Thomas Hood
Henry Colburn, 1857
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Página 350 - True wit is nature to advantage dress'd ; What oft was thought, but ne'er so well express'd ; Something, whose truth convinc'd at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind.
Página 451 - ... only from a lucky hitting upon what is strange : sometimes from a crafty wresting obvious matter to the purpose. Often it consisteth in one knows not what, and springeth up one can hardly tell how. Its ways are unaccountable, and inexplicable ; being answerable to the numberless rovings of fancy, and windings of language.
Página 278 - FORASMUCH as it hath pleased Almighty God of his great mercy to take unto himself the soul of our dear brother here departed, we therefore commit his body to the ground; earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust; in sure and certain hope of the Resurrection to eternal life...
Página 392 - Goethe's sage mind and Byron's force ; But where will Europe's latter hour Again find Wordsworth's healing power ? Others will teach us how to dare, And against fear our breast to steel ; Others will strengthen us to bear — But who, ah ! who, will make us feel ? The cloud of mortal destiny...
Página 451 - Tis that which we all see and know : any one better apprehends what it is by acquaintance than I can inform him by description. It is indeed a thing so versatile and multiform, appearing in so many shapes, so many postures, so many garbs, so variously apprehended by several eyes and judgments, that it seemeth no less hard to settle a clear and certain notion thereof, than to make a portrait of Proteus, or to define the figure of a fleeting air.
Página 176 - Because you are not merry : and 'twere as easy For you to laugh, and leap, and say you are merry, Because you are not sad. Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time...
Página 388 - Twill murmur on a thousand years And flow as now it flows. 'And here, on this delightful day, I cannot choose but think How oft, a vigorous man, I lay Beside this fountain's brink. ' My eyes are dim with childish tears, My heart is idly stirr'd, For the same sound is in my ears Which in those days I heard.
Página 289 - The air broke into a mist with bells, The old walls rocked with the crowd and cries. Had I said, " Good folk, mere noise repels — " But give me your sun from yonder skies!" They had answered,
Página 451 - Sometimes it lieth in pat allusion to a known story, or in seasonable application of a trivial saying, or in forging an apposite tale ; sometimes it playeth in words and phrases, taking advantage from the ambiguity of their sense, or the affinity of their sound ; sometimes it is wrapped in a dress of...
Página 351 - But wit, abstracted from its effects upon the hearer, may be more rigorously and philosophically considered as a kind of discordia concors; a combination of dissimilar images, or discovery of occult resemblances in things apparently unlike.

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