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SELECTIONS FROM THE WRITINGS OF EMINENT AMERICAN
HISTORIANS, AND OTHER AMERICAN

WRITERS OF NOTE.

TO WHICH ARE ADDED

The Declaration of Independence, and the Constitution of the

United States, with Copious Notes.

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FULLY ILLUSTRATED WITH MAPS, PORTRAITS, AND PIEW&

BY

JOHN J. ANDERSON, PH.D.,
Author of a Grammar School History of the United States," a "Manual of General
History," a History of England," a History of France," "The Historical

Reader," "The United States Reader," etc., etc.

"

8 1492

NEW YORK:
EFFINGHAM MAYNARD & Co., PUBLISHERS,

Salvador

771 BROADWAY.

2。

1889.

ANDERSON'S HISTORICAL SERIES

A Junior Class History of the United States. Illustrated with hundreds of portraits, views, maps, etc. 306 pages. 16mo.

A New Grammar School History of the United States. Supplemented by maps, engravings, chronological summaries, tabulated analyses, review questions, appendix, etc. 360 pages. 12mo.

A Grammar School History of the United States. Annotated; and illustrated with numerous portraits and views, and with more than forty maps, many of which are colored. 340 pages. 16mo.

A Pictorial School History of the United States. Fully illustrated with maps, portraits, vignettes, etc. 439 pages. 12mo.

A Popular School History of the United States, in which are inserted, as a part of the narrative, selections from the writings of eminent American historians, and other American writers of note. Fully illustrated with maps, colored and plain; portraits, views, etc. 381 pages. 12mo.

A Manual of General History. Illustrated with numerous engravings and with beautifully colored maps showing the changes in the political divisions of the world, and giving the location of important places. 500 pages. 12mo.

A New Manual of General History, with particular attention to Ancient and Modern Civilization. With numerous engravings and colored maps. 685 pages. 12mo. Also, in two parts. Part I. ANCIENT HISTORY: 300 pages. Part II. MODERN HISTORY: 385 pages.

A School History of England. Illustrated with numerous engravings and with colored maps showing the geographical changes in the country at different periods. 378 pages. 12mo.

A Short Course in English History. With numerous engravings and maps. 215 pages. 12mo.

A School History of France. Illustrated with numerous engravings, colored and uncolored maps. 373 pages. 12mo.

A History of Rome. Amply illustrated with maps, plans, and engravings. 554 pages. By R. F. LEIGHTON, Ph.D. (Lips.).

A School History of Greece. In preparation.

Anderson's Bloss's Ancient History. Illustrated with engravings, colored maps, and a chart. 445 pages. 12mo.

The Historical Reader, embracing selections in prose and verse, from standard writers of Ancient and Modern History; with a Vocabulary of Difficult Words, and Biographical and Geographical Indexes. 544 pages. 12mo.

The United States Reader, embracing selections from eminent American historians, orators, statesmen, and poets, with explanatory observations, notes, etc. Arranged so as to form a Class-manual of United States History. Illustrated with colored historical maps. 436 pages. 12mo.

ETTINGHAM MAYNARD & Co., Publishers, HARVARD

771 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

Copyright, 1879, by John J. Anderson. AUG 8 1957

56*129

PREFACE.

A TEXT-BOOK upon the history of our country so compiled as to be a pleasant reading-book, with enough variety to give it all the interest properly belonging to a reading-book, and, at the same time, contain all the United States history that is required for ordinary school purposes, has long been desired by many teachers.

It has been the aim of the author of this work to meet this want. He has realized, however, that to undertake the preparation of the work without outside assistance would surely end in failure, for no such undertaking could possibly have within itself the elements of variety so necessary in a school reader. But variety, merely as such, is of no special importance. It is that variety which not only elevates, but cultivates and ennobles the mind of the pupil-a variety only to be obtained by selecting from the writings that have met the approval of men of judgment and scholarship.

The plan carried out in this volume, it is believed, fully accomplishes this object. The works of all the American writers who have distinguished themselves in the domain of historic authorship, have been diligently consulted ; and, as far as seemned possible consistently with the size and scope of the undertaking in hand, these authors have been made to contribute to the contents of the volume. It may, therefore, be said to be the work of many-fifty or more—of our ber writers, past as well as present; and, in addition to its metin as a continuous historical narrative, it may be regarded as a text-book for young students in American literature. To know something of Bancroft, Palfrey, Prescott, Motley, Haw

thorne, Irving, Bryant, Hildreth, Sparks, Everett, Parkman, and other distinguished American writers, and to have some knowledge of what and how they wrote, is not only to make a good beginning in an acquaintance with our leading authors and with the best American literature, but it is to create a taste for such literature and a desire for further acquaintance with these authors.

In presenting another history of our country as a text-book for schools, it has been the aim of the writer to give only those events that were important in themselves, or that had an important bearing upon or relation to important results. It will be seen, then, that very much of that which finds a place in the ordinary school history, is not found here. Details, except as far as they are necessary to the proper understanding of what should be known, are entirely omitted. Generally, they are not worth knowing, and, consequently, no time should be spent in lumbering the mind with them. For the same reason, dates have been given sparingly. The most prominent, those that mark the great events, are clearly given, while other events are regarded as contributing to, or resulting from these. More prominence has been given to the facts that have to do with the nation's progress in civil matters than to those of a military character. Therefore, the invention of the cotton-gin and the magnetic telegraph and the construction of railroads and steamboats, with the changes resulting therefrom, have been regarded and treated as of more value than the numerous small battles that in no wise modified the tendency of great events.

Too much importance cannot be given to geography in its connection with history. It is certain that an accurate knowl. edge of history cannot be acquired and retained without a full and clear knowledge of its accompanying geography. Events, to be remembered, must be associated with place. To study history in any other way is to waste time, as every successful student and teacher must be able to testify. The numerous maps in this work cover all the geography belong.

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