Labor and the Wartime State: Labor Relations and Law During World War II

Capa
University of Illinois Press, 1998 - 307 páginas
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The United States labor movement can credit -- or blame -- policies and regulations created during World War II for its current status. Focusing on the War Labor Board's treatment of arbitration, strikes, the scope of bargaining, and the contentious issue of union security, James Atleson shows how wartime necessities and language have carried over into a very different post-war world, affecting not only relations between unions and management but those between rank and file union members and their leaders.
 

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Índice

The Context of Wartime Labor Relations
1
The Mobilizing Period Dress Rehearsal for Wartime
20
The Response to War
44
The War Labor Board and the Law of Collective Bargaining
55
Managerial Prerogatives Collective Bargainings Forbidden Zone
86
The Institutional Security of Unions
103
The NoStrike Pledge in Principle and Practice
130
The New Industrial Workers
158
The Transference of Wartime Visions to Peacetime
203
The Contractualism of Labor Relations and the Postwar Consensus
221
The Limits of Mature Collective Bargaining
243
Afterword
281
Reported Work Stoppages in Automotive Plants in December 1944 and January 1945
285
Executive Order 9370 Enforcement of Directives of the National War Labor Board
293
War Labor Disputes Act
296
Index
303

The Threat of Restrictive Legislation
188

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