Langston Hughes and the Chicago Defender: Essays on Race, Politics, and Culture, 1942-62

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University of Illinois Press, 1995 - 261 páginas
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Langston Hughes is well known as a poet, playwright, novelist, social activist, communist sympathizer, and brilliant member of the Harlem Renaissance. He has been referred to as the "Dean of Black Letters" and the "poet low-rate of Harlem."

But it was as a columnist for the famous African-American newspaper the Chicago Defender that Hughes chronicled the hopes and despair of his people. For twenty years, he wrote forcefully about international race relations, Jim Crow, the South, white supremacy, imperialism and fascism, segregation in the armed forces, the Soviet Union and communism, and African-American art and culture. None of the racial hypocrisies of American life escaped his searing, ironic prose.

This is the first collection of Hughes's nonfiction journalistic writings. For readers new to Hughes, it is an excellent introduction; for those familiar with him, it gives new insights into his poems and fiction.

 

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Índice

No HalfFreedoms
25
Key Chains with No Keys
27
Get Together Minorities
29
The SeeSaw of Race
31
Sorry Spring
33
US Likes Nazis and Franco Better Than Its Own Negroes
34
A Sentimental Journey to Cairo Illinois
36
The Dilemma of the Negro Teacher Facing Desegregation
38
The Fall of Berlin
135
SegregationFatigue
139
Hed Leave Him Dying
141
Ask for Everything
143
If Dixie Invades Europe
145
Gall and Glory
147
Hey Doc I Got Jim Crow Shock
149
Fifty Young Negroes
151

How to Integrate without Danger of Intermarriage
40
A Brickbat for Education A Kiss for the Bedroom in Dixie
41
The Man of the Year for 1958
43
Sit Tight and Dont Squirm
45
Jim Crows Epitaph
47
Are You Spanish?
49
Doc Wait I Cant Sublimate
51
Theaters Clubs and Negroes
53
Adventures in Dining
55
Encounter at the Counter
56
Freight
58
With the Crumbling of the Old Chain Jim Crow Crumbles Too
60
MacArthur Lives in the WaldorfAstoria Gilbert Lives in Jail
62
From Rampart Street to Harlem I Follow the Trial of the Blues
63
In Racial Matters in St Louis De Sun Do Move
65
Old Customs Die Hard
67
Jim Crows Epitaph
69
Fair Play in Dixie
73
Letter to the South
75
Hold Tight Theyre CrazyWhite
77
Nazi and Dixie Nordics
78
Fair Play in Dixie
80
Dear Old Southland
82
The Death of Bilbo
84
The Sunny South
86
Far from Living Up to Its Name Dixie Has Neither Manners nor Shame
87
The Quaint Queer Funny Old South Has Its Ways
89
Concerning a Great Mississippi Writer and the Southern Negro
91
The Same Old Fight All Over Again in Dixie
92
Nerve of Some White Folks
95
Jokes on Our White Folks
97
Letter to White Shopkeepers
99
Suggestions to White Shopkeepers
101
The Snake in the House
103
Nerve of Some White Folks
105
Shame
107
So?
109
Boo
110
Those Little Things
112
Harlems Bitter Laughter
113
The Folk Lore of Race Relations
115
Brazenness of Empire
119
America after the War
121
The World after the War
123
The Detroit Blues
124
Photographs from Teheran
126
Colored Lived There Once
128
Invasion
130
OverRipe Apple
132
The Animals Must Wonder
134
The Purple Heart
153
War and a Sorry Fear
155
VJ Night in Harlem
156
North South and the Army
158
Are You a Communist?
161
The Red Army
163
Army of Liberation
165
The Soviet Union
167
The Soviet Union and Jews
168
The Soviet Union and Color
170
The Soviet Union and Women
172
The Soviet Union and Health
174
Faults of the Soviet Union
176
Light and the Soviet Union
178
Are You a Communist?
180
A Thorn in the Side
182
A Portent and a Warning to the Negro People from Hughes
184
Old Ghost Appears before the UnAmerican Committee and Refuses to Remove His Hat
185
The Accusers Names Nobody Will Remember but History Records Du Bois
187
Why 111 Winds and Dark Clouds Dont Scare Negroes Much
188
Beating Out the Blues
191
Child of Charm
193
Music at Years End
195
The Duke Plays for Russia
197
On Leaping and Shouting
199
Art and Integrity
200
Art and the Heart
202
Steins
204
Return of the Native Musically Speaking the Drums Come to Harlem
205
The Influence of Negro Music on American Entertainment
207
How a Poem Was Born in a Jim Crow Car Rattling from Los Angeles to New Orleans
208
Slavery and Leadbelly Are Gone but the Old Songs Go Singing On
210
Its Yesterday Today and Its Potential Tomorrow
212
House Rent Parties Are Again Returning to Harlem
214
That Sad Happy Music Called Jazz
216
Here to Yonder
219
Why and Wherefore
221
Dont Be a Food Sissy
223
On Missing a Train
225
Saturday Night
227
Random Thoughts on Nice People
229
On Human Loneliness
231
My Day
233
My Nights
235
New York and Us
236
From the International House Bronzeville Seems Far Far Away
238
Notes
241
Selected Bibliography
253
Index
255
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Página 9 - We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of "separate but equal" has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. Therefore, we hold that the plaintiffs and others similarly situated for whom the actions have been brought are, by reason of the segregation complained of, deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment.
Página 3 - Rivers I've known rivers: I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins. My soul has grown deep like the rivers. I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young. I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep. I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I've seen its muddy bosom turn all golden in...
Página 5 - We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark-skinned selves without fear or shame. If white people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, it doesn't matter. We know we are beautiful. And ugly too. ... If colored people are pleased we are glad. If they are not, their displeasure doesn't matter either. We build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how, and we stand on top of the mountain, free within ourselves.
Página 6 - Beat it on away from here now. Make way for a new guy with no religion at all — A real guy named Marx Communist Lenin Peasant Stalin Worker ME — I said, ME!
Página 4 - aunties," "uncles," and "mammies" is equally gone. Uncle Tom and Sambo have passed on, and even the "Colonel" and "George" play barnstorm roles from which they escape with relief when the public spotlight is off. The popular melodrama has about played itself out, and it is time to scrap the fictions, garret the bogeys, and settle down to a realistic facing of facts.
Página 9 - States that there shall be no discrimination in the employment of workers in defense industries or government because of race, creed, color, or national origin...

Referências a este livro

Acerca do autor (1995)

Christopher C. De Santis is a professor of African American Literature and Chair of the Department of English at Illinois State University. He is the editor of Langston Hughes: A Documentary Volume and volumes 9 and 10 of The Collected Works of Langston Hughes.

Informação bibliográfica