In Praise of Oxford: Life and manners

Capa
Constable, Limited, 1911
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Página 615 - Ah, Sir, I was mad and violent. It was bitterness which they mistook for frolick. I was miserably poor, and I thought to fight my way by my literature and my wit; so I disregarded all power and all authority.
Página 551 - With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank ; and his big manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
Página 630 - Who could resist the charm of that spiritual apparition, gliding in the dim afternoon light through the aisles of St. Mary's, rising into the pulpit, and then, in the most entrancing of voices, breaking the silence with words and thoughts which were a religious music, — subtle, sweet, mournful...
Página 541 - While some on earnest business bent Their murmuring labours ply 'Gainst graver hours that bring constraint To sweeten liberty: Some bold adventurers disdain The limits of their little reign And unknown regions dare descry: Still as they run they look behind, They hear a voice in every wind, And snatch a fearful joy.
Página 757 - Almighty God, Father of all mercies, we thine unworthy servants do give thee most humble and hearty thanks for all thy goodness and loving-kindness to us, and to all men : we bless thee for our creation, preservation, and all the blessings of this life ; but above all, for thine inestimable love in the redemption of the world by our Lord Jesus Christ, for the means of grace and for the hope of glory.
Página 397 - As lene was his hors as is a rake, And he was not right fat, I undertake ; But loked holwe, and therto soberly.
Página 342 - If any thing was alive or awake in me, it was a little vanity, such as even those good men used to entertain, when the monks of their own order extolled their piety and abstraction. For I found myself received with a sort of respect, which this idle part of mankind, the learned, pay to their own species ; who are as considerable here, as the busy, the gay, and the ambitious are in your world.
Página 593 - THE King observing with judicious eyes The state of both his universities, To one he sent a regiment : for why ? That learned body wanted loyalty. To th' other he sent books, as well discerning How much that loyal body wanted learning.
Página 421 - No, no, thou hast not felt the lapse of hours ! For what wears out the life of mortal men? 'Tis that from change to change their being rolls; 'Tis that repeated shocks, again, again, Exhaust the energy of strongest souls, And numb the elastic powers.
Página 420 - ... seen no more ! — Maidens, who from the distant hamlets come To dance around the Fyfield elm in May, Oft through the darkening fields have seen thee roam, Or cross a stile into the public way. Oft thou hast given them store Of flowers — the frail-leaf 'd, white anemone, Dark bluebells drench'd with dews of summer eves, And purple orchises with spotted leaves — But none hath words she can report of thee.

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