A Pitch of Philosophy: Autobiographical Exercises

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Harvard University Press, 1996 - 196 páginas
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A distinguished historian chronicles the rise of music and musicians in the West from lowly balladeers to masters employed by fickle patrons, to the great composers of genius, to today’s rock stars. How, he asks, did music progress from subordinate status to its present position of supremacy among the creative arts? Mozart was literally booted out of the service of the Archbishop of Salzburg “with a kick to my arse,” as he expressed it. Yet, less than a hundred years later, Europe’s most powerful ruler—Emperor William I of Germany—paid homage to Wagner by traveling to Bayreuth to attend the debut of The Ring. Today Bono, who was touted as the next president of the World Bank in 2006, travels the world, advising politicians—and they seem to listen. The path to fame and independence began when new instruments allowed musicians to showcase their creativity, and music publishing allowed masterworks to be performed widely in concert halls erected to accommodate growing public interest. No longer merely an instrument to celebrate the greater glory of a reigning sovereign or Supreme Being, music was, by the nineteenth century, to be worshipped in its own right. In the twentieth century, new technological, social, and spatial forces combined to make music ever more popular and ubiquitous. In a concluding chapter, Tim Blanning considers music in conjunction with nationalism, race, and sex. Although not always in step, music, society, and politics, he shows, march in the same direction.
 

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A pitch of philosophy: autobiographical exercises

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Cavell is an odd man out at Harvard-a philosopher with a taste for romanticism and an interest in rhetoric. He was especially moved by J.L. Austin's How To Do Things with Words (1975), one kind of ... Ler crítica na íntegra

Índice

Philosophy and the Arrogation of Voice
1
CounterPhilosophy and the Pawn of Voice
53
The Metaphysical Voice
59
Worlds of Philosophical Difference
67
Pictures of Destruction
75
Derridas Austin and the Stake of Positivism
77
On the Tragic
86
Exclusion of the Theory of the NonSerious
88
What Thing Is Transmitted? Austin Moves
106
Two Pictures of Language in Relation to the World
112
Signing
116
Opera and the Lease of Voice
127
Bibliography
169
Acknowledgments
177
Subject Index
189
Name Index
192

Skepticism and the Serious
95
Assigning
103

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Acerca do autor (1996)

Stanley Cavell was born Stanley Louis Goldstein in Atlanta, Georgia on September 1, 1926. He received a degree in music from the University of California, Berkeley and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Harvard University. From 1953 to 1956, he was a junior fellow in Harvard's Society of Fellows. He then taught for six years at the University of California, Berkeley. He returned to Harvard to teach in 1963, becoming professor emeritus in 1997. His first book, Must We Mean What We Say?, was published in 1969. His other books included The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy; Pursuits of Happiness: The Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage; and Themes Out of School: Effects and Causes. He died from heart failure on June 19, 2018 at the age of 91.

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