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were trying to hold Lincoln up is an example of

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vocal objections to the direct investuent rule?

MR. MCALEER : objection.

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THE WITNESS:

This is one of those phrases

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where ay choice of words was not very good.

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don't, I don't think "punishing' was exactly the

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violation of it, that people would have had this

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believe that those two things together wer.
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STICKLEY & SCHUTZHAN, INC.

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The Committee has received a number of letters expressing concern that your participation in meetings with representatives of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board to discuss the board's review of the activities of Lincoln Savings was prompted by certain contributions made by Mr. Charles Keating, president of Lincoln Savings. Attached for your reference is a complaint filed by Common Cause.

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1ST STORY of Level 1 printed in FULL format.

Copyright (c) 1986 American Banker

November 3, 1986, Monday

SECTION: 6MERICAN EAN ER WEEKLY REVIEW; WASHINGTON MONDAY: Pg. 13

LENGTH: 477 words

HEADLINE: A Banter's Guide to the Elections

BYLINE: By JAY POSENSTEIN

500Y:

Tuesday, American voters will choose 34 senators, 435 House members, and M3.5, as a result, a new national policy on banking. Here's what to look for when the election returns come in.

• Control of the Senate: Whether the Democrats take control from the Republicans is the big question this year. Doing so would mean new Senate

leadership and new committee chairmen. Sen, William Proxmire, 0-Wis., could erd op once again as chairman of the Banking Committee. Other possibilitie: are Sens. Alan Cranston of California or Gerald W. Riegle Jr. of Michigan, A

Democrat-controlled Senate Banking Committee could mean less talk in that forum about expanding bank powers and more scrutiny of financial institutions and their regulators. Consumer issues and rental housing also could tecsme priorities in the Senate. With Democrats in control of both the House and she Senate, there could be more cooperation between the two bani ing Committee, out the might be more at odds with a Fepublican atministration on banking legislation and matters such a nominations to the Federal Reserve Bard.

• Some hey Senate races: Seven of the 15 current Banking Committee members are up for reelection, but only Sens. Slade forton, R-Wash., and Mack Mattingly, R-Ga., are considered in much trouble. Chairman Jake Garn, R-Utah, will be reelected easily. Democratic Rep. Timothy E. Wirth, an outspol en Cynllo wher it comes to expanded bank powers, is battling to become a Colorado senator and could end up on the Banking Committee.

• Some ley House races: Banking Committee Chairman Fernand J. St Germain, O-R.I., facing allegations of wrongdoing, is in his first close roce in years but should won reelection. Rep: George C. Wereley. R-N.Y., o banking supporter

SPECIAL COUNSEL also surrering from sume recent bad publicity, might not be as lucky as the chairman. Other committee members in tough battles: Reps. Stephen L. Neal, D-N.C., a subcommittee chairman; Stewart 8. McKinney, R-Conn., and John Hiler, R-Ind.

• New faces from the industry: Bill Grant, a Florida Democrat who for the last 14 years has been :ne president of the Bank of Madison County, Madison, Fla., seems likely to win a vacant House seat. Robert Neall, a commercial loan officer for the last four years with the Annapolis Banking and Trust Co., Maryland, is doing well in his campaign for a House seat despite being at a disadvantage in name recognition -- and in height. His Democratic opponent is Tom McMillen, a six-foot-eleven former professional basketball player. Bill Story, once a Bank of America employee, is waging an uphill battle for a Democratic seat from Colorado. On the Senate side, Idaho Gov. John V. Evans, a Democrat, who with his family has had an ownership interest in a few banks

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(C) 1986 American Banker, November 3, 1986

there, is fighting incumbent Republican Steven 0. Symms.

GRAPHIC: Drawing, Drawings by Peter Kuper

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