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mer shower compared with the tempest which descended upon Herndon. His publishers failed, and his book became difficult to obtain. The reasons for the criticism heaped upon it and its author need not here be discussed. It is a book which every collector desires, and that in the first edition. If he is able to procure it for less than fifty dollars for the three volumes, he does well; it is practically certain that it will sell before many years for at least a hundred.

Another edition of this work, in two volumes, and with some omissions and modifications, and a new Introduction by Horace White, was issued by Appletons, and is still on sale. For all purposes except those of the collector and the author this edition is as good as the expensive

one.

Two of Lincoln's secretaries, John G. Nicolay and John Hay, prepared and issued a work in ten volumes, entitled, "Abraham Lincoln: A History." It first ran in the Century Magazine, and appeared in book form in 1890. It is a mine of information, invaluable to all who would follow the career of Lincoln into its details, but it is a history rather than a biography.

In the same year appeared "The Life of Abraham Lincoln" by Ida M. Tarbell, which had been running as a serial in McClure's Magazine. It is a picturesque, well illustrated work, and generally reliable. It is easily the first among works which may be held to portray the magazine Lincoln.

The American Statesman Series is a valuable series throughout. Its general editor, John T. Morse, Jr., reserved to himself the writing of the two volumes on Lincoln. It is a good piece of biographical work, though somewhat cold and academic.

The Centennary of Abraham Lincoln, in 1909, saw the publication of innumerable works relating to the great President. They need not be named here, for this is no attempt to give a complete list of books about Lincoln, and most of those that appeared in that and subsequent years are still in print or easily obtainable. All that this sketch undertakes is to indicate the stages of growth of the Lincoln literature.

There have been and are innumerable anthologies, collections, and monographs on various aspects of the career of Lincoln, some of them of very considerable value, and all of them of interest. Every anniversary of Lincoln's birth

mer shower compared with the tempest which descended upon Herndon. His publishers failed, and his book became difficult to obtain. The reasons for the criticism heaped upon it and its author need not here be discussed. It is a book which every collector desires, and that in the first edition. If he is able to procure it for less than fifty dollars for the three volumes, he does well; it is practically certain that it will sell before many years for at least a hundred.

Another edition of this work, in two volumes, and with some omissions and modifications, and a new Introduction by Horace White, was issued by Appletons, and is still on sale. For all purposes except those of the collector and the author this edition is as good as the expensive

one.

Two of Lincoln's secretaries, John G. Nicolay and John Hay, prepared and issued a work in ten volumes, entitled, "Abraham Lincoln: A History." It first ran in the Century Magazine, and appeared in book form in 1890. It is a mine of information, invaluable to all who would follow the career of Lincoln into its details, but it is a history rather than a biography.

A small and appreciative but not highly valuable Life of Lincoln has recently been published with Hon. Ralph Shirley as its author. An American edition has been issued and is on the market.

But far the most notable and valuable of English works on Lincoln is that of Lord Charnwood. While he makes many mistakes, he has given us a work of genuine value. In some things he has been able to see American life with sufficient detachment and clarity to justify him in a discriminating and critical, and at the same time thoroughly appreciative, judgment. One can make no mistake in buying and reading Charnwood, even though he must make allowances for certain limitations in the work of an author who does not know American life thoroughly.

To Charnwood we are indebted for the suggestion of John Drinkwater's play, "Abraham Lincoln," just now enjoying a rather astonishing vogue. Drinkwater acknowledges his debt to Charnwood, and it is apparent. What shall we say of this simple drama which started obscurely in Birmingham, captured London, and now, having achieved a great success in New York and Washington, is certain to

be seen and profoundly enjoyed in every American city?

The play is wrong in almost every possible detail, and right in its essential message. The author does not understand America, and his Lincoln is so thoroughly English that he almost drops his h's. It is an Englishman's interpretation of another Englishman's interpretation of Lincoln. An English author does not easily understand that Lincoln, after delivering his notable speech on the "house divided against itself," which he addressed to the Republican convention in Springfield in 1858, was still not an abolitionist. He opposed the further extension of slavery into the territories, but had no present plan or desire to interfere with it where it existed in the States. His emancipation policy was an intellectual and political and spiritual evolution. Nothing can be further from the truth than that Lincoln, when nominated, stood so committed to a policy akin to that of John Brown as is assumed in the opening lines of Drinkwater's play-a policy which would then deliberately plunge the nation into civil war for the sake of the freedom of the slave. Such an interpretation wholly denies what we know of the growth of the

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