U.S.-U.S.S.R. Trade Relations: Department of State Replies to a Letter by J.W. Fulbright, and Other Documents Pertaining to Trade Relations Between the United States and the Soviet Union

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1959 - 40 páginas
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Página 3 - The condimental antiseptics as defined by the Regulations governing Meat Inspection of the US Department of Agriculture, include salt, saltpetre, sugar, vinegar, wood smoke and spices, and the use of these substances for the curing of meat is allowed in the United States of America as well as in other countries. Of these, the most important is salt. The methods of curing meat, as the application of these substances to meat is called, differ depending on whether the meat is whole or comminuted. The...
Página 7 - United States export and import trade is carried on by individual firms and not under governmental auspices. There is no need, therefore, to formalize relations between United States firms and Soviet trade organizations. Soviet trade organizations are free right now, without any need for special action by the United States Government, to develop a larger volume of trade with firms in this country.
Página 7 - Elsenhower made it clear that "the United States favors the expansion of peaceful trade with the Soviet Union" and spoke of the importance of trade as a means of strengthening the possibilities for independent actions by the countries of Eastern Europe." President Kennedy in his first State of the Union...
Página 5 - Organizations of meetings of American and Soviet scientists and specialists for discussing problems of production of synthetic materials . . . Mutual participation of Soviet scientists in the work of scientific research institutions of the United States of America, and of American scientists in the work of scientific research institutions of the USSR (concerning) new types of synthetic materials and technological processes.
Página 7 - President Eisenhower made it clear in a letter to him that the US favored expansion of peaceful trade with the Soviet Union pointing out that "it could be of mutual benefit and serve ;to improve our relations in general, especially if it were accompanied by broad contacts between our peoples . . ." The policies initiated by President Eisenhower to improve relations with Eastern Europe were supported and strengthened by the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. The economic and political changes which...
Página 39 - Export controls of the Department of Commerce The export control regulations administered by the Department of Commerce are contained in the Comprehensive Export Schedule, published annually by the Bureau of Foreign Commerce (BFC) of the Department of Commerce. Changes in these regulations are published regularly by BFC in Current Export Bulletins.
Página 5 - ... agreements with firms for obtaining licenses in individual cases; inviting American specialists to work in Soviet enterprises as consultants on the production of certain synthetic materials, and for acquainting Soviet specialists with the production of these materials and finished articles thereof. . . . "Organization of meetings of American and Soviet scientists and specialists for discussing problems of production of synthetic materials. . . . Mutual participation of Soviet scientists in the...
Página 6 - Of course, it is possible to begin the development of commerce on the basis of reciprocal deliveries." Khrushchev continued: "It is also obvious that development of trade between the USSR and the USA will require the creation of the requisite contractual and legal basis. The question of creating such a basis, as well as that of implementing a program for purchases of American goods and deliveries of...
Página 5 - Khrushchev said that the Soviet Union would be willing, in return, to export manganese and chromium ores, cellulose and paper products, ferrous alloys, platinum, palladium, asbestos, potassium, salts, lumber, certain chemical products, furs, and other goods, "as well as a number of types of modern machinery and equipment which could be of interest to American firms.
Página 7 - ... organizations are free right now, without any need for special action by the United States Government, to develop a larger volume of trade with firms in this country. . . . Furthermore, many of the more important Soviet trade items mentioned in your letter are accorded duty-free entry into the United States. While the extension of long-term credits for Soviet purchases in the United States would raise complex legal and political questions, the normal commercial credit terms presently available...

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