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INDEX TO VOLUME XXXVII.

FRONTISPIECE: "THE WEDDING DAY."

ADVENTURES AMONG THE AUSTRIANS IN BOSNIA.
AMERICAN MILLIONAIRES.
AMERICANS, THE: A CONversation and a Speech, with an
ADDITION. By Herbert Spencer..

ANIMAL MYTHOLOGY; OR, STORIES OF Birds and Beasts.

By J. A. Farrer.

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FEMALE CHARACTERS, ON SOME OF SHAKESPEARE'S. VI.... Blackwood's Magazine..... ................................ 299
FESTIVAL AMONG THE BASQUES..
FIRESIDE MUSINGS ON SERIOUS SUBJECTS... .............................................. Blackwood's Magazine.
FLEURETTE...

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HUMOROUS IN LITERATURE, THE. By J. Henry Shorthouse..Macmillan's Magazine..........

INDIAN FESTIVAL, AN.

LAST EXTREMITY, THE............................................................................................

LIFT THINE EYES.......................

LITERARY NOTICES:

Corea: The Hermit Nation, 136-A Guide to _Modern_English History, 136-John Greenleaf Whittier:

His Life, Genius, and Writings, 136-Eighteenth Century Essays, 137-Spare Hours, 137-The Boy's Percy,
138-The Romantic School, 138-The Speeches and Table-Talk of the Prophet Mohammad, 139-The Sub-
jection of Hamlet, 280-Winners in Life's Race, 281-Poems of American Patriotism, 281-Campaigns of the
Army of the Potomac, 281-American Men of Letters: James Fenimore Cooper, 282-The Wisdom of the
Brahmin, 283-Studies in Philosophy. Ancient and Modern, 283-History of the United States of America
from the Discovery of the Continent, 284-Renaissance in Italy: Italian Literature, 425-Homespun_Stories,
26-The Beginnings of History, 426-English Colonies in America, 427-Ragnarok: The Age of Fire and

Gravel, 428-Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases, 428-On the Desert, 570-Lyrical and Dramatic Poems,

$71-On Viol and Flute: Selected Poems, 571-Figures of the Past, 571-The Jews of Barnow, 572-The

Use of the Voice in Reading and Speaking, 573-A Word, only a Word, 573-Appletons International Scien-

tific Series, 711-Recollections of Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, late Dean of Westminster, 712-Oliver Cromwell:

The Man and his Mission, 713-Ice-Pack and Tundra, 714-Hygiene for Girls, 714-Famous Women: George

Eliot, 714-Leading Men of Japan, 714-The Yearly Moons, 715-Life of Lord Lawrence, 855-Works of

Frederic Huidekoper, 856-A History of the People of the United States, from the Revolution to the Civil

War, 857-Classic Mythology, 857-The Navy in the Civil War, 858-Letters to a Friend, 858-Landmarks of

English Literature, 858-Outlines of the Constitutional History of the United States, 859.

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Bricks without Straw, 143-Early Printing in China, 143-Australian Marriages, 144-Children's Books,
287-Cold Drinks in Cold Weather, 287-Are Mushrooms Poisonous? 288-Earth-worms in New Zealand, 288
Moses in the Bulrushes, 288-Millais, 431-Voltaire among English "Roughs." 431-Two Corbies, 432-
Love's Day. 432-Editorial Work in Newspaper Offices, 576-Banting Outdone, 576-Poverty, 576-The Octo-
pus and its Enemies, 719-Egyptian Women, 719-The Cow-Tree, 720-Balfe's Maid of Artois," 720-The
Causes and Cure of Old Age, 720-Mankind's Mistakes, 863-Doré's "Don Quixote," 863-Roman Learning,
863-Vestiges of Ancient Cremation, 864-Lost Cities, 864.

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OTTOMAN POETRY. By Stanley Lane-Poole.

OUR ORIGIN AS A SPECIES. By Richard Owen, C.B., F.R.S.Longman's Magazine..
PHANTASMS OF THE LIVING. By Edmund Gurney and F. W.

.Fortnightly Review.....

PHOTOGRAPHIC EYES OF SCIENCE, THE. By Richard A.

Proctor....

H. Myers...

POETS AND NIGHTINGALES.

POETRY:

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410

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560

Blackwood's Magazine......
Macmillan's Magazine.....

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A GHOST. By the author of "Mrs. Jerningham's Journal."Longman's Magazine...............
A WINTRY SONNET. By Christina G. Rossetti...

AN AUTUMN MORNING

AZENOR. By Lewis Morris.

Eis exeivny. By the late Charles Badham.......
BY NEIGHBOR's Well..

CHURCH-GOING TIM..

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Macmillan's Magazine..
Temple Bar...

......... ................

"FRATER AVE Atque Vale." By Alfred Tennyson.......The Nineteenth Century....
HOURS OF REST. By Anna H. Drury..
MASKS AND FACES. By F. E. Weatherly..
MY LIBRARY..

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Blackwood's Magazine..
Macmillan's Magazine..
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Cornhill Magazine.
Macmillan's Magazine....
Belgravia Magazine...

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The Nineteenth Century............................................ 721
Contemporary Review.......................................................................... 448
The Nineteenth Century.
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Cornhill Magazine

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849
SEA CALLS, THE
............................................................................... 652
SCIENCE, THE LIMITS OF. By Rev. George Edmundson..... Contemporary Review........................................................................... 595
SCIENCE AND ART:

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Atropia for Earache, 140-A New Vegetable Styptic, 141-How a Man Walks, 141-A Salt Mine Two
Thousand Years Old, 141-Archæological Discoveries at Revel, 141-The Fire-flashing Plant, 142-Asiatic
Rug Making, 142-The Spectrum of the Large Comet, 143-The Constellations, 285-The Siamese, 285-Sci-
ence and Suicide, 285-Cholera Removed by a Hurricane, 286-Dr. Siemens on the Future of Electric Light-
ing, 286-Insect Hibernation, 286-Peat-Mould for Dressing Wounds, 286-Alcohol as a Freezing Agent, 429-
Dental Caries, 429-The Growth of Children, 430-Bacillus of Tubercle in the Breath, 430-New Observations
on Rabies, 430-Anti-Malarial Plants, 430-Tidal Machinery, 575-A New Air-Pump, 575-Simple Method of
Measuring Refraction, 575-Fireproof Balloons, 716-Chills, their Causes and Consequences, 717-Aërial Nav-
igation by Electricity, 717-An Artificial Aurora, 717-The Solar Corona, 718-Sulphur and Malaria, 718-
Locusts in Cyprus, 718-Medicated Flannel, 860-An Angry Tree, 861-Plants and Moonlight, 861-Electric
Lighting and Ventilation, 861-The Northern Boundary of the United States, 861-Hot Water as a Beverage,
862-Velocity of Balloons, 862-Improved Gas-Burners, 862.
SHAKESPEARE AND GEORGE ELIOT..

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TROLLOPE, ANTHONY. By Edward A. Freeman, D.C.L......Macmillan's Magazine..
TROLLOPE, ANTHONY. By Mrs. Oliphant..

UNDERGRADUATE'S AUNT, AN. By F. Anstey, author of

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.......Macmillan's Magazine........

UNDER THE SNOW. By Katharine S. Macquoid..
VIOLIN'S VOICE, THE. By Beatrice Harraden.
WAGNER AND WAGNERISM. By Edmund Gurney..
WALT WHITMAN. By G. C. Macaulay....
WATER WE DRINK, THE. By Prof. Simpson, M.D..
WORK AND OVERWORK. By J. Milner Fothergill, M.D....

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The Nineteenth Century...........................................................................
The Nineteenth Century
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FOREIGN LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART.

Old Series comTM Iplete in 63 vols.

KABOOKA BAY was a quiet spot on the desolate Congo coast. There was no European habitation within forty miles of it on one side or the other, and the whitewashed roof of the factory, or trading station there, could be seen from far out at sea, a solitary spcek on the border of an almost treeless, barrenlooking country.

The large wide bay itself was bounded at each end by low cliffs; and from dark seams in the sides of these exuded a thick shale oil, which lay yellow and greasy on the surface of the pools of sea water at their bases, amid the rocks round which the sea curled and poured.

Nevertheless the surf was neither so high nor so heavy at Kabooka as at many other places along the coast. Out seaward, instead of the usual lines of white dangerous water, were only here NEW SERIES.-VOL. XXXVII. No. I:

and there little patches of foam, where the rollers came upon the hidden rocks. Close inshore the breakers fell in almost gentle succession, and at last spent themselves on a beach of fine sand, strewn with coral-encrusted seaweed, pink, white, gray, grass-green, yellow, and purple in color; while delicate sea-shells of all shapes, tints, and sizes, lay scattered about, and glistened in the rays of a tranquil sunset.

Drawn up beyond the reach of the water lay two gayly-striped surf-boats, their sharp curved stems pointing seaward. Beyond them a pathway was worn through the bent grass, and led up a gentle slope to the factory.

On the planked veranda of the low wooden felt-thatched house sat two white men in the coast costume of a shirt and a pair of white duck trousers a-piece, enjoying the cool of the evening after the long heat of the day. And the

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two had had a piece of hard work, as upward of a hundred tusks of ivory lying in the dark cargo-room of the factory testified. These had all been bought during the day, and probably more would be forthcoming from the native traders on the morrow. On this day, too, a steamer from Europe had been due at Kabooka, and it was the probability of her arrival before they should be ready to ship their ivory by her that the two men had been discussing.

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Ah, well, when she comes," said the elder-a dark, sallow-faced, but good-looking man-"she will be the last but one before my relief arrives, and then 'hey for England, home, and beauty! Eh, Master James Barker?" "Ay," returned the younger; "and I don't know how I shall get on without you, sir," he added. Since you took me, a sick ship lad, out of the old bark in Sharks' Creek, and nursed me to life again, when near every man aboard died of the 'bilioso' fever, you've been more than a father to me— you have, sir ;" and the lad turned a glance full of gratitude and trust toward his companion.

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"Tuts, tuts," replied the elder, shortly, yours was the worst case, and you were the youngest on board; so naturally I took care of you. But what's more to the purpose, James, you've amply repaid anything I ever did for you since you've been in the service of the firm. You've turned out an honest, brave boy, an AI trader, and a prime favorite with the natives; and I'll go bail you'll be quite indispensable to my relief when he comes; for I dare say he'll be some fellow quite ignorant of the trade and the way of the natives here," and Mr. Monke's voice had in it a touch of sarcasm.

Let me go home with you," suddenly pleaded the lad. "I will be your faithful servant'; I will not ask for wages from you if "-and he stopped"if you will only allow me to be near you," he whispered.

Mr. Monke stared. Here was evidence of attachment in all sincerity. He was flattered; but he said, "What, James Barker! you propose to be my servant? And what about your position on the coast ? Why, you will be an

agent in charge in course of time, with a station all to yourself, and your own master. If the firm had only taken my advice, they'd have put you in here until I returned; but they never do the correct thing until it is too late," he added, having another fling at his relief. I am sick of the coast; I hate it," returned the lad vehemently, the color mounting in his face.. "The same sea, sky, and land, day after day. Nothing but the prickly bush and the niggers to look at. Why, sir," he went on quickly, to hide what the other might possibly deem ingratitude, "we haven't seen a white man for three months, and not a white woman for as many years.'

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"Ha, ha!" laughed the elder man, kindly, seeing through the pretended disgust of the lad, "you've tired of it all very suddenly. And as for a white woman, wait till you have a beard. I never heard you mention the name of one before, James. You surely did not leave a sweetheart at home, eh ?''

"No, sir," replied the lad, shortly, and rose as a native servant, clad in a white flowing cloth, caught dexterously round his shoulders, came on the veranda, and after making a low salaam with the whitish palms of his hands turned outward, announced that dinner was served. He then, with free stride, followed his white masters into the diningroom, his round black face and thick red lips showing in the lamplight like polished ebony and coral. There could not have been a greater contrast to him and the other three of his race who waited at the table-the counterparts of himself in the physique of their frames, and the unmeaning look of their broad faces-than the two white men. The latter, though thin and pale through the effect of the climate, and looking as if any one of their servants could have mastered them with ease, had yet in their clear cut features, and, above all, in the quick intelligent look of their eyes, a something that gave warning not only of what they could do, but would attempt.

Yet between the two there was a great difference beside that of age. Monke's face was dark, thoughtful, and sarcastic in expression, seeing through things, as the natives well knew. The lad's countenance, on the contrary, was open and

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