Economics Confronts the Economy

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Edward Elgar Publishing, 25/05/2006 - 396 páginas
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Takes a look at contemporary economic analysis, and presents a view of the state of economics.

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Índice

1 The unchanging focus of modern economics
8
do we get what we want or want what we get?
41
3 Lowering the learning in economics 19502000
84
the world of microeconomics
123
the world of macroeconomics
166
6 Theory and the role of the public sector
225
7 Focus on mainstream economicsobstacles to the competition for new ideas
269
an alternative view dont cry for me economics
320
Index
381
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Passagens conhecidas

Página 340 - THE annual labour of every nation is the fund which originally supplies it with all the necessaries and conveniences of life which it annually consumes, and which consist always either in the immediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations.
Página 10 - By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain; and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it. By pursuing his own interest, he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually...
Página 9 - But the annual revenue of every society is always precisely equal to the exchangeable value of the whole annual produce of its industry, or rather is precisely the same thing with that exchangeable value.
Página 99 - For man's character has been moulded by his every-day work, and the material resources which he thereby procures, more than by any other influence unless it be that of his religious ideals; and the two great forming agencies of the world's history have been the religious and the economic.
Página 10 - ... intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it. By pursuing his own interest he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it.
Página 11 - The poverty of the lower ranks of people in China far surpasses that of the most beggarly nations in Europe.
Página 11 - Marriage is encouraged in China, not by the profitableness of children, but by the liberty of destroying them. In all great towns several are every night exposed in the street, or drowned like puppies in the water. The performance of this horrid office is even said to be the avowed business by which some people earn their subsistence.
Página 9 - He generally, indeed, neither intends to promote the public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it. ... he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention.
Página 171 - natural rate of unemployment," in other words, is the level that would be ground out by the Walrasian system of general equilibrium equations, provided there is imbedded in them the actual structural characteristics of the labor and commodity markets, including market imperfections, stochastic variability in demands and supplies, the cost of gathering information about job vacancies and labor availabilities, the costs of mobility, and so on...
Página 170 - Congress hereby declares that it is the CONTINUING policy AND responsibility of the Federal Government TO USE ALL PRACTICABLE MEANS consistent with its needs and obligations and other essential considerations of national policy WITH THE ASSISTANCE AND COOPERATION OF industry, agriculture, labor, and State and local governments, TO COORDINATE AND UTILIZE ALL ITS PLANS, FUNCTIONS, AND RESOURCES FOR THE PURPOSE...

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