Lincoln at Cooper Union: The Speech that Made Abraham Lincoln President

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Simon & Schuster, 2004 - 338 páginas
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Lincoln at Cooper Union explores Lincoln's most influential and widely reported pre-presidential address -- an extraordinary appeal by the western politician to the eastern elite that propelled him toward the Republican nomination for president. Delivered in New York in February 1860, the Cooper Union speech dispelled doubts about Lincoln's suitability for the presidency, and reassured conservatives of his moderation while reaffirming his opposition to slavery to Republican progressives.

Award-winning Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer places Lincoln and his speech in the context of the times -- an era of racism, politicized journalism, and public oratory as entertainment -- and shows how the candidate framed the speech as an opportunity to continue his famous "debates" with his archrival Democrat Stephen A. Douglas on the question of slavery.

The Cooper Union speech, which was carefully researched by Lincoln and refers often to the Founders and authors of the Constitution, is an antislavery lecture, capped by a ringing warning to would-be secessionists in the South. It reaches its climax with the assurance that "right makes might." Long held, inaccurately, to be an appeal to the conservatives, Holzer presents Lincoln's speech as a masterly combination of scholarship, a brief for equality and democracy, and a rallying cry to the country and the Republican party.

Holzer describes the enormous risk Lincoln took by appearing in New York, where he exposed himself to the country's most critical audience and took on Republican senator William Henry Seward of New York, the front-runner, in his own backyard. Then he recounts the brilliant and innovative public relations campaign, as Lincoln took the speech "on the road" in his successful quest for the presidency.

Lincoln at Cooper Union explores Lincoln's most influential and widely reported pre-presidential address -- an extraordinary appeal by the western politician to the eastern elite that propelled him toward the Republican nomination for president. Delivered in New York in February 1860, the Cooper Union speech dispelled doubts about Lincoln's suitability for the presidency, and reassured conservatives of his moderation while reaffirming his opposition to slavery to Republican progressives.

Award-winning Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer places Lincoln and his speech in the context of the times -- an era of racism, politicized journalism, and public oratory as entertainment -- and shows how the candidate framed the speech as an opportunity to continue his famous "debates" with his archrival Democrat Stephen A. Douglas on the question of slavery.

The Cooper Union speech, which was carefully researched by Lincoln and refers often to the Founders and authors of the Constitution, is an antislavery lecture, capped by a ringing warning to would-be secessionists in the South. It reaches its climax with the assurance that "right makes might." Long held, inaccurately, to be an appeal to the conservatives, Holzer presents Lincoln's speech as a masterly combination of scholarship, a brief for equality and democracy, and a rallying cry to the country and the Republican party.

Holzer describes the enormous risk Lincoln took by appearing in New York, where he exposed himself to the country's most critical audience and took on Republican senator William Henry Seward of New York, the front-runner, in his own backyard. Then he recounts the brilliant and innovative public relations campaign, as Lincoln took the speech "on the road" in his successful quest for the presidency.

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LibraryThing Review

Procura do Utilizador  - wildbill - LibraryThing

First let me say that the author does justify writing another book about Abraham Lincoln. Plus, he makes a good argument that this speech helped to make Lincoln president. More important he provides ... Ler crítica na íntegra

LINCOLN AT COOPER UNION: The Speech That Made Abraham Lincoln President

Procura do Utilizador  - Kirkus

Had it not been for his "right makes might" speech on Feb. 27, 1860, at New York's Cooper Union college, Abraham Lincoln might well have remained a rustic lawyer and back-country raconteur.One can ... Ler crítica na íntegra

Índice

Introduction I
1
Chapter One Abe Lincoln Must Come
7
Chapter Two So Much Labor as This
28
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Referências a este livro

A Thinking Reed
Barry Jones
Pré-visualização limitada - 2006
A Thinking Reed
Barry Jones
Pré-visualização limitada - 2007
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Acerca do autor (2004)

Harold Holzer has authored, co-authored, and edited twenty-two books on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, including The Lincoln Image, Lincoln Seen and Heard, Dear Mr. Lincoln: Letters to the President, Lincoln as I Knew Him, and Lincoln on Democracy. He has won a number of awards, including the Lincoln Diploma of Honor from Lincoln Memorial University, and the Civil War Round Table's Nevins-Freeman Award, and sits on historical advisory boards for a number of the nation's Civil War museums. Holzer, who is vice president for communications and marketing at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, serves also as co-chairman of the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, and as founding vice chairman of The Lincoln Forum. He lives in Rye, New York.

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